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The first time I flew the Hudson river, I was both terrified and amazed!



The first time I flew the Hudson river, I was both terrified and amazed! I remember having five rescue Chihuahua, a crew plane in front of me and a NBC producer in my second seat with camera all over. I was part of a news story about moving rescue dogs around the country from kill shelters. Our final destination was a little airport just north of New York City.

It was breathtaking to see the sites as we moved through the city. We were so close to everything and so close to the ground, however it seemed like I was part of a perfectly choreographed movement. All the other aircraft in the air were perfectly in line and it was pretty much like just rolling up the road in your car.

Everyone should take this trip at least once. To help, I have included a great article an PDF. The article is written by a contributing author to the AOPA and the PDF was constructed by the FAA. Both give great insight into the ways of the corridor. So, take a read, plan your trip and make the leap - you will not be disappointed!

TAKE THE LEAP

DO WE EVEN NEED TO CONVINCE YOU TO GO ON THIS TRIP?

By Jill Tallman

You can cruise the Hudson River under New York’s Class B airspace on your own personal tour of the Big Apple. This corridor gives pilots an exclusive perspective on such iconic landmarks as the Empire State Building; the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum; and the Statue of Liberty. The tour has regulatory requirements, including the completion of a New York Special Flight Rules Area course before you launch. See the FAA website and download a kneeboard reference that lays out the requirements. A temporary flight restriction went into effect in close proximity to the corridor after Donald Trump was elected president; check notams before flight, as details of the TFR may change.

TOTALLY WORTH IT

Look for: The six mandatory reporting points. They are the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, the George Washington Bridge, the Statue of Liberty, the Clock Tower, the USS Intrepid, and the Alpine Tower. All are depicted on the New York Terminal Area Chart, which you should study before your trip and must have with you in the airplane.

Don’t miss: Circling the Statue of Liberty, counterclockwise. Watch out for helicopter tours, which fly an irregular pattern near the statue at approximately 500 feet.

Scared of traffic? This is a heavily traveled route. Stay on the correct side of the river, hold a steady altitude, use all aircraft lights, and don’t make unexpected turns. The Skyline Route through New York’s Class B airspace lets you trade a lesser view for less traffic.

WHY YOU SHOULD GO: 1. BREATHTAKING VIEWS OF THE CITY 2. SHARPEN YOUR ATC COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS 3. A CHECK ON YOUR AVIATION BUCKET LIST

Get your own copy of this PDF here


Get your own Kneeboard PDF here:

www.faasafety.gov/files/gslac/courses/content/79/775/kneeboard.pdf

Article source:

https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2017/march/flight-training-magazine/road-trip-hudson-river-corridor


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